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The Ageless Art Of Ajrakh Printing In India

The unbroken traditions among the many states and the faultless traditions of our nation have long been recognised as its greatest assets. Block art painting has long been regarded as one of India's challenging yet rewarding crafts. This culture has been practised and preserved for centuries by weavers from the prehistoric era, however, it has not received the recognitio...


The Ageless Art Of Ajrakh Printing In India

The unbroken traditions among the many states and the faultless traditions of our nation have long been recognised as its greatest assets. Block art painting has long been regarded as one of India's challenging yet rewarding crafts. This culture has been practised and preserved for centuries by weavers from the prehistoric era, however, it has not received the recognition it merits. We'll be taking a closer look at how Ajrakh, one of the oldest block art prints, came into being and how  Ajrakh sarees quickly rose to fame in the fashion industry.

Ajrakh has a wide range of distinctive connotations. The primary hue of the artwork is blue, which also happens to be one of the Arabic words that define the word Ajrakh. Many people are unaware of this type of block art because it is only found in some regions of India.

History & Origin of Ajrakh print 

The Kutch region of Gujarat, India, is where the traditional block printing technique known as "Ajrakh print" first appeared. The term "Ajrakh" is derived from the Arabic word "Azrak," referring to blue, and the process mostly employs indigo and madder-coloured natural dyes.

Ajrakh printing has a long history and is thought to have originated with the Indus Valley Civilization more than 4,500 years ago. The Khatris, a group of ancient fabric workers who migrated from Sindh to Kutch during the 16th century, further improvised this method.

Ajrakh printing is a challenging and drawn-out procedure. On both ends of the cloth, it is washed, dyed, and printed in phases using hand-carved wooden blocks. The elaborate designs used to create the blocks have been handed down through the Khatri community from generation to generation.

In the past, Ajrakh print sarees for women and  dupattas (scarves) have been printed with ajrakh patterns to showcase a rich look. As a sustainable and environmentally friendly method of textile printing, ajrakh print sarees have grown in demand today and are fashioned for a variety of events. Other products, including  Ajrakh print kurtis, also use the Ajrakh print. 

At iTokri apart from Ajrakh print sarees for women, you can also  buy sarees online with a variety of options. Explore our collection of  Rajasthani leheriya sarees and  Bandhani sarees to make your saree collection more interesting and colourful. 

Process of Ajrakh Print Sarees

The production of Ajrakh clothing is a highly laborious and tedious process. The designs and colour schemes are printed on the fabrics at different levels. The cloth is then allowed to cure for two days before being dipped in the next dye solution after being cleaned multiple times in a specific dye solution. The roots of the weave may get firmer and much more sarcastic than expected as a result of the repetition of similar actions. One complete article of clothing must be prepared