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Chanderi Sarees

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All You Need To Know About Chanderi Sarees

Whether it's the delicate georgette or the intricate Banarasi weave, India is blessed with a range of fabrics and weaving techniques; there is complexity, ability, and dedication in every thread. The Indian textile industry captures the personalities of its regions, whether it be in the colourful Bandhej or the intricate Ikat. India's textile sector once enjoyed a position of esteem throughout the world, and many fashion brands continue to produce their magnificent creations there today. Even the most basic weaves made in our nation have an ai...

All You Need To Know About Chanderi Sarees

Whether it's the delicate georgette or the intricate Banarasi weave, India is blessed with a range of fabrics and weaving techniques; there is complexity, ability, and dedication in every thread. The Indian textile industry captures the personalities of its regions, whether it be in the colourful Bandhej or the intricate Ikat. India's textile sector once enjoyed a position of esteem throughout the world, and many fashion brands continue to produce their magnificent creations there today. Even the most basic weaves made in our nation have an air of elegance. Each weave, whether it's a modest Tant saree from Bengal or the opulent Kanjivaram made with real Zari, is stunning. 

The Chanderi Saree is a well-known saree made by handlooms. Chanderi sarees come in a variety of styles. However, Chanderi, a town in Madhya Pradesh, is where the most genuine chanderi handloom saree is made. In our nation's history and myths, both the town and the saree have a place. The tales are captivating, and they help us comprehend the delicate weave we like to embellish.

Both Chanderi's mythology and history are fascinating. The Scindias, a famous royal family in the nation, promoted the industry. The tradition of the weavers, however, dates from between the seventh and the twelfth centuries. The Jhansi Koshti weavers relocated to Chanderi and carried their weaving there. The peak of the industry occurred during the Mughal era. Chanderi fabrics, which could reach a length of over fifteen yards, were so thin and delicate during the reign of Emperor Jahangir that they would not even weigh a single kilogramme. So creative was it. The sarees were worn by royal families across the nation during joyous occasions like marriage and childbirth. These comprised, among others, the nobles from Kolhapur, Baroda, Indore, and even Nagpur. The Chanderi weaving procedure can take a few days to several weeks. It is impossible to overstate the weavers' perseverance and talent.

The craft fell out of favour in the 17th century, but the Scindia royal family continued to support it after 1920. Here, the craft was vigorously revitalised and reintroduced; everyone fell in love with the translucent, billowing cloth right away. At this time, gold-based motifs were first used. However, Manchester's low-quality mill yarn presented the craft with fierce competition. However, Chanderi Sarees have managed to hold their own and are among the finest weaves in the nation. The complicated weaving process used to create this lovely fabric. 

The delicate tapestry's tiny threads are woven with the vibrant, rich legacy of our nation, and it makes us proud. Chanderi sarees are a crucial component of our textile industry, and their heritage and connection to our mythology only serve to highlight how unique they are. Being able to wear a Chanderi silk saree is quite exceptional; this lyrical saree is soft, airy, and distinct from other saree styles that are popular in our nation. Chanderi sarees can be very visually appealing thanks to their peacock, geometric, and floral themes. Some of the finest weaving in the nation may be found in these sarees. The grandeur of the saree is indescribable and beyond description.

Why Choose iTokri?

We owe it to one of our nation's greatest artistic traditions to preserve and advance it. As awareness grows, it will be easier to conquer other challenges. Therefore, we must make it a point to support these local artists by buying their work whenever we can, as doing so will encourage them to create more work and keep them motivated. If you wish to purchase anything from these local manufacturers, check out iTokri for affordable and amazing quality products you can also find  chanderi silk fabrics,   chanderi silk dress material,  chanderi weaving dupatta,  chanderi silk stoles  chanderi blouse fabrics and many other printed fabrics that are worth buying! 

FAQs 

How to identify Chanderi sarees?

It can be challenging to spot a fake Chanderi, but it is stated that if you carefully rub your hands over the silk and if it makes a sound like you are walking on snow, it is authentic. Chanderi is unlike textiles made in factories because of its sheer, delicate texture, light weight, and glossy transparency.

Who invented Chanderi sarees?

Shishupal, the cousin of Lord Krishna, is thought to have founded Chanderi, which has its roots in the Vedic era. Three types of fabrics are created by the Chanderi: Chanderi cotton, silk cotton, and pure silk.

Can you wash Chanderi?

It is preferable to dry clean only, never wash, chanderi sarees! By doing this, the cloth will be protected from damage. The saree will be ready to wear if you iron it at a low temperature.

Is Chanderi comfortable?

You may experience how pleasant the fabric is by purchasing a soft chanderi saree from a reliable saree store in Kolkata. It is hassle-free to wear and looks beautiful for every occasion in any season. It is one of the cool-wearing saree kinds, making it perfect for the sweltering summers in India.

Can Chanderi be worn in summer?

Chanderi is a summer-friendly fabric since it is light. It is also offered in vibrant hues and has a light shine, making it appropriate for wearing by both sexes. Cotton, light silk, and a little zari are combined to create chanderi.

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